Salted Coconut Sugar Caramels (Paleo & Vegan)

paleo caramel

Salted caramel must be one of the all-time best taste sensations. With the holiday season fast approaching I thought it would be fun to try making coconut sugar caramels and topping them with some beautiful finishing sea salt. There may not be such a thing as paleo candy but I suppose this comes pretty close.

We happened upon the sea salt at a food specialty store while down the Jersey Shore this past summer. The store stocked many indulgences from around the world including exotic olive oils and infused vinegars. But the Hawaiian Black Lava and Red Alaea Sea Salts caught our attention. We procured them with the hope they would find their way into a recipe deserving of their beauty and flavor.

Behold Salted Coconut Sugar Caramels!

paleo salted caramel

paleo caramelSalted coconut sugar caramels are made with coconut sugar, coconut sap (liquid version) and coconut cream. This means the caramels have a lower glycemic index than if we had used white sugar. Does this mean that people with diabetes or weight issues should be eating this candy? I would say no. However, if you are looking for something sweet and fun as a treat, this coconut sugar caramel might be for you. They make great gifts too.

This is what your friends and loved-ones will see after opening one of your homemade salted caramels.

paleo salted caramel

The taste imparted by the coconut sugar/sap is different from regular sugar. The coconut sugar is a little more like brown sugar and the coconut sap has a definite tang to it. It imparts a very distinct flavor as does the use of coconut cream. The vanilla, cinnamon and ginger serve to accent and mellow out the tanginess of the coconut sugar and the ghee gives it that smooth and creamy taste that can only be achieved with the use of dairy products. If you do not have ghee or prefer a vegan option you can try it with coconut oil which will give it a more distinctly coconut flavor.

paleo salted caramel

The first time I made this salted caramel I only cooked it to 250 degrees F before immediately pouring it into the pan to set. It created a very soft finished product that was delicious but hard to work with. I reheated the caramel and allowed it to go to 265 or 270 and quickly poured it out into the prepared pan. This created a soft caramel that held its shape. The next time I made the coconut sugar caramel I let it go to 270 and it stayed there for a few minutes. This created a much harder finished caramel. G actually preferred this version and my boys did as well, likening it to the texture of a tootsie roll. Personally, I liked the slightly softer version the best and thought it was much easier to handle and cut.

Salted Coconut Sugar Caramels

Inspired by Not Without Salt.

Ingredients

You will need a candy thermometer to monitor the temperature of the caramel.

Instructions

  1. Prepare a 9 inch square baking pan by covering with oil then a layer of parchment paper.
  2. Combine the coconut sugar, coconut sap, coconut cream, ghee, cinnamon and ginger in a large pot. Scrape the seeds out of the vanilla bean and add them to the pan along with the vanilla bean itself. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Watch closely so the mixture doesn’t boil over and use a candy thermometer to monitor the temperature. Cook over medium-high heat, stirring often until you reach hard-ball stage (250 degrees). This should take about 20-30 minutes (or more depending on how high your heat). Remove the vanilla bean. If you want a harder caramel you can cook to higher temp (270 degrees). (You may have to lower the temperature to ensure the candy does not scorch.)paleo caramel
  3. Pour caramel into the prepared pan and allow it to cool until completely set. (You can put it in the refrigerator to speed up the process)paleo caramel
  4. Invert the caramels onto a parchment covered cutting board, sprinkle with finishing sea salt of choice then cut caramel into desired size. Individually wrap the coconut sugar caramels in wax paper and then decorative paper of choice. paleo salted caramels
  5. Store in an airtight container at room temperature up to 2 weeks.

Enjoy!

paleo caramel

Find Paleo Spirit on Facebook!

To subscribe to Paleo Spirit enter your email below. You will be sent a confirmation email. If you don’t see it immediately you should check your spam folder.

Enter your email address:Delivered by FeedBurner
Pin It

Related posts:

8 thoughts on “Salted Coconut Sugar Caramels (Paleo & Vegan)

  1. Sounds and looks like something my kids (and myself) would like! Could I use honey instead of coconut nectar? Not familiar with nectar…

  2. Your caramels look amazing. However, I have to tell you that your comment about how people with diabetes should not eat them is based on an outdated understanding of diabetes. People with diabetes can eat things with sugar in them, in fact sometimes they NEED to eat sugar. People with diabetes can eat anything that anyone else can. They need to plan for it, and add it to a well balanced meal plan, just like anyone. Please stop perpetuating the myth about sugar being off limits to diabetics, it simply isn’t true. Also, the comment about people with weight issues not eating them. Seriously? People with weight issues should be watching total calorie intake, eating a balanced healthy diet, and exercising, just like anyone. Why can’t they indulge in a small treat now and then? Your comments expose your prejudice and misinformation.

    • I don’t have any prejudice against diabetics or people watching their weight. This blog is dedicated to health and caters specifically to people trying to get healthy and/or lose weight. I gave a slight caveat given that many people coming to this site are looking for recipes that are very low sugar. This one is not so I’m merely pointing out people trying to lose weight or their sugar levels should use caution. It’s a post about candy – at Christmas time – let’s keep things positive.

  3. I’m thinking that you could get away with a lot less coconut sugar. I think many paleo followers would attest to their palates being less sugar focussed. I may try this and follow up on it.

  4. Thanks for the recipe. I just made these last night and they are GREAT.
    I did a half batch.
    Substituted honey for coconut nectar and vanilla extract for bean & didn’t have any ginger :)

    I turned a piece into a candybar with a bit of dark chocolate and crushed a macadamia nut into the caramel.

  5. I think I used coconut sugar last time I made caramels, many months ago. It was so delicious, but definitely addictive. I’m almost afraid to try this recipe, it looks so good! But you’re right, there’s probably nothing better than salted caramel. I will be trying this. I’ve been browsing your site and you have some really amazing looking recipes. Brava!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>